CMH Heli-Skiing signs MoU with Shuswap Indian Band

CMH Heli-Skiing signs MoU with Shuswap Indian Band 24 Feb, 16, Source: Shuswap Indian Band

The Shuswap Indian Band, an aboriginal community located in Invermere, B.C. and CMH, the world’s first heli-skiing and heli-hiking operator, announced today that they have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), to enhance information sharing and cross-cultural understanding, and develop environmental stewardship and community-based initiatives within Southeastern British Columbia’s East Kootenay region.

The MoU was signed today by Shuswap Indian Band Chief Barb Cote and Rob Rohn, CMH Heli-Skiing and Summer Adventures Director of Mountain Operations.

“Because we operate in the Shuswap Indian Band’s traditional territory, we are delighted to formalize our partnership with the Shuswap Band and look forward to working together to develop meaningful community, cultural and environmental stewardship practices,” said Rohn.

“We are honoured to be working with CMH Heli-Skiing and Summer Adventures to be able to share our unique Shuswap culture with their guests,” said Chief Cote. “In our overnight experience at CMH Bugaboos we were amongst visitors from all over the world, and it was great to see the respect illustrated by CMH staff in recognizing the importance of local aboriginal culture, in addition to seeing the care they take in protecting the environment.”

Following today’s signing, the Shuswap Indian Band and CMH will begin work on specific initiatives focusing on tourism stewardship, Shuswap First Nation youth career development, and cultural sharing and preservation within CMH’s skiing and hiking operations.

ABOUT SHUSWAP INDIAN BAND:

Shuswap Indian Band (Kenpesq’t people) have always been keepers of the land, using its bounty to sustain their way of life. Native culture hinges on the belief that the land responds positively to care and respect. Traditionally, the people of the Shuswap Indian Band occupied and used a vast territory from the Big Bend area to Revelstoke to the Trail area in the south and east to the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Today, almost half of the Band members live on a single Indian Reserve adjacent to the town of Invermere. There are approximately 287 members living on and off reserve.

Related Posts