Canadian potash miner gives $1M gift to STARS air ambulance

Canadian potash miner gives $1M gift to STARS air ambulance 23 May, 17,

Saskatchewan’s newest solution potash mine may draw its product from underground, but the company that built it is already looking to the sky to give back to its employees and the people of the province.

At the grand opening of their Legacy mine today, K+S Potash Canada (KSPC) announced a $1 million gift to STARS to help fund the non-profit’s helicopter air ambulance operations in Saskatchewan.

“It is our pleasure to support such an important organization,” said Dr. Ulrich Lamp, president and chief executive officer of K+S Potash Canada. “We are grateful to have STARS in our province, and we want to ensure their life-saving services are available for years to come.”

The donation by KSPC will be directed toward the operation of STARS’ bases in Regina and Saskatoon. The Government of Saskatchewan provides approximately 50 per cent of the funds needed to run STARS in Saskatchewan, meaning STARS must raise the remaining $10.5 million annually through fundraising events and individual, community and corporate donations.

“Today K+S Potash Canada made a substantial investment in the health and safety of its employees, their communities and of the entire province,” said Andrea Robertson, president and chief executive officer of STARS. “This generous gift will help save many lives and will impact countless others. But it will also fuel innovation, enabling us to continue providing world-class emergency air medical care and transport to those who need it most.”

KSPC had a strong connection to STARS well before the mine opening. The son of a KSPC employee was cared for and transported by STARS after he sustained multiple injuries in a snowmobile accident in January 2016.

“Timing was critical, so it was very important for STARS to be able to come and assist,” said former patient Brad Cochrane. “I honestly could not thank them enough for being there for me.”

“Because STARS was there for Brad, Brad is still there for us,” said KSPC employee and father Gene Cochrane. “A true success story.”

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