HAI President Message – Get a Cardboard Box

HAI President Message – Get a Cardboard Box 24 Jul, 18, Source: HAI

We will get to why aviation professionals need a cardboard box in a minute. But first, did you ever think you would see our industry move away from the word helicopter? It appears we are morphing into the vertical-lift industry, unmanned vertical industry, or the vertical urban air-taxi industry, take your pick.

I don’t disagree with this transformation. We are in an exciting time in our industry as different types of aircraft, such as drones, tiltrotors, and autonomous vehicles, come onto the civil market.

HAI supports those who make, operate, fix, maintain, overhaul, or supply all vehicles, manned or unmanned, that can operate in the vertical-lift mode and perform that wonderful maneuver, the hover. As one of the old guys in this industry, I started out flying helicopters and I intend to go out flying an aircraft called a helicopter — but I know that word is no longer big enough to hold all the facets of our industry.

In an effort to be more inclusive, HAI will look at changing our name to better reflect our membership, which includes those active in both manned and unmanned vertical-lift aviation. If you have any ideas on the potential rebranding of HAI, please let me know your thoughts.

Now about that cardboard box.

Many, many, many years ago, one of my mentors and I were discussing safety and corporate ethics. He noted that, regardless of the position you hold — owner, manager, pilot, maintenance technician, or customer — we are all part of the cultural team that controls safety and ethics. And yes, the two are closely related.

My mentor’s ethical philosophy — and mine — can be summarized as “do the right thing.” To achieve the desired result of zero accidents, we must employ this attitude in our everyday risk assessment and decision-making, on every flight, on every job.

To achieve zero accidents in our industry, we must acknowledge that we will not be able to transport every patient, meet the desires of every customer, ferry every corporate executive, or fly every tour flight or training session. When you believe that safety is being compromised, “I cannot safely do that and so I will not do that” is the only acceptable response.

So how does the cardboard box come in?

As the discussion with my mentor progressed, he told me, “Matt, at some time in your career, either as a line pilot, manager, or executive, there will come a time when you will be confronted with a situation that you know to be unsafe, not compliant with regulations, or unethical. This could be in connection with flight operations or even just everyday business operations.”

When that happens, he said, “You need to hold your ground and do what you know to be the right thing. To do this successfully, you need to be able to remove from your decision-making the potential negative impacts of the decision on yourself, such as the possible loss of your job.”

In our industry, we must go to work each day willing to accept negative consequences as a result of doing the right thing. If we cannot do this, then “doing the right thing” isn’t meaningful. “Doing the right thing … when it’s convenient” doesn’t have the same power.

This sounds tough, but when you consider the potential of a flawed decision — the loss of lives in the aircraft or on the ground — it makes sense. Your objective is to do your job each day in a safe, professional manner. When you cannot do that, then speak up.

“Also,” my mentor continued, “You need to get a cardboard box.” I told him, “I understand everything you’ve told me, and I agree. But what’s with the box?” He laughed and then explained. “The box is there so you can pack up your personal items before you walk out the door for the last time. Take it home, and then have dinner with your family and fly another day.”

Since that conversation, I have had a cardboard box close to me, in view, to remind me of his advice and my obligation to those who put their trust and lives in our care. I suggest you get your own box. It may help you get through some tough days.

Have I ever packed the box?

That is another tale for another day. That’s my story and I am sticking to it. Let me know what you think at [email protected].

As always, fly safe, fly neighborly — and keep those rotors turning!

Best regards, 

Matt Zuccaro

Matt Zuccaro is president and CEO of HAI.

 

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