Husky Energy donates ultrasound machines to STARS

Husky Energy donates ultrasound machines to STARS 25 Mar, 10, Source: STARS

Husky Energy’s President & Chief Executive Officer John C.S. Lau presented the Alberta Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society (STARS) with a $100,000 cheque today at the Calgary STARS base to fund two new ultrasound machines.

“The use of ultrasounds offers another important, sophisticated tool to assist our air medical crew in caring for the critically ill and injured,” says Dr. Greg Powell, President and CEO of STARS. “This generous gift from Husky Energy will have a direct and positive influence on the health and safety of patients transported by STARS.”

“The STARS air medical team has saved countless lives by providing emergency transportation and the best medical equipment available where it is needed the most,” says Mr. Lau. “Husky’s top priority is the health and safety of our employees and the communities where we operate, and STARS is a valued partner in our goal.”

Ultrasound is a significant addition to STARS capability in caring for critically ill and injured patients. This tool in the airborne environment enables emergency responders to more accurately ascertain internal injuries than is possible through traditional assessment methods.

The STARS Calgary base air medical crew has already been using an ultrasound since early 2009, while the new machines will be provided to the STARS Edmonton and Grande Prairie bases.

The Husky Energy funded ultrasound machines are specifically made for use as emergency diagnostic equipment. They are different from conventional ultrasound machines, such as those commonly used to create an image of a womb during pregnancy.

The Alberta Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society (STARS) is a non-profit, community-based organization that provides airborne intensive care to critically ill and injured patients. Patient care and transport, emergency medical communications, education and research and fundraising and community partnerships are the pillars of the STARS program.  Since it began in 1985, STARS has flown nearly 19,000 missions.

Related Posts