Anti-poaching with the H125

Anti-poaching with the H125 30 Apr, 19, Source: Airbus Helicopters

The statistics are dire. Less than 4,000 tigers are left in the wild. The western black rhino and northern white rhino are now extinct outside of protected reserves (1). These animals, and hundreds of other species, are victims of poaching – killed for their pelts, horns, tusks, shells, etc. – and sold around the world as trophies, medicine, clothing, jewelry, and exotic meat. Poaching is second only to habitat destruction as a threat to the future of the world’s endangered animal populations, according to the World Wildlife Fund. The “bad guys” are poachers, to be sure, aided by sophisticated trafficking networks. But the guilty also include consumers.

We often fly areas that we usually don’t see from the ground, and we can see when there is a problem happening in that area. The helicopter helps in alerting our team to that problem.

Carl-Heinz Moeller, chief pilot for the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism

Stepping up the effort

Heroic efforts are taking place to combat wildlife crime, from educational campaigns like the one in international airports, to Namibia’s increase in resources earmarked for on-the-ground anti-poaching.

And in-the-air. At least two countries have added the H125 helicopter to their arsenal in the anti-poaching fight. The Botswana Police Service employs one of four H125s for anti-poaching missions, in addition to their regular law enforcement duties. And Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism employs an H125 to perform game capture, aerial surveys and game counts, and for general park management.

“Our aircraft falls under wildlife support services,” says Carl-Heinz Moeller, chief pilot for the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism. “We often fly areas that we usually don’t see from the ground, and we can see when there is a problem happening in that area. The helicopter helps in alerting our team to that problem.”

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