Johanniter Luftrettung puts first of two H145 D3s into service

Johanniter Luftrettung puts first of two H145 D3s into service

1-Dec-2021 Source: Johanniter Luftrettung

[electronic translation] With the H 145, Johanniter is expanding its fleet to include the most modern helicopter type currently in use in civil air rescue. The smaller, lighter and quieter machine has a state-of-the-art autopilot system and instead of the previously usual four rotor blades has five – these ensure a more stable and calmer position in the air, which is beneficial for the patient. State-of-the-art technology is built into the machine and the interior layout has also been revised; the latter enables the emergency doctor to act more flexibly during the flight.

The generous window arrangement not only gives the pilots a better view, the entire interior of the machine is brighter, appears larger and more open.

From now on in use: intensive care transport helicopter H 145 with the identification D-HJLA

In the presence of Dr. Christoph Ullrich, District President of the Gießen Regional Council, the approval authority for air rescue in Hesse; Clinic Director Professor Dr. Michael Sander, Senior Physician Professor Dr. Simon Little and Senior Physician Dr. Alexander Schlier, all three of whom work in the Clinic for Anesthesiology, Operative Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy of the University Clinic Gießen and Marburg GmbH in Gießen, as well as the emergency doctor and medical director of the Johanniter Luftrettung, Mumi Taleb. Commissioned November. The district president personally activated the machine by inserting the radio chip. After numerous training flights, the white-red machine with the anthracite-colored rear end and the identification D-HJLA (Germany – Helikopter, Johanniter Luftrettung, Alpha) will now go into action as Christoph Gießen. With increasing utilization of the intensive care beds in German hospitals, the intensive care transport helicopter (ITH) will carry out transfer flights for intensive care patients together with the neighboring ITH Christoph Mittelhessen, but at the same time will continue to be used for rescue operations in accordance with the order. Less than an hour after activation by the district president, the time had come: the detector left, an assignment for secondary transport – an intensive care patient is to be transferred from Winterberg to another clinic. With increasing utilization of the intensive care beds in German hospitals, the intensive care transport helicopter (ITH) will carry out transfer flights for intensive care patients together with the neighboring ITH Christoph Mittelhessen, but at the same time will continue to be used for rescue operations in accordance with the order. Less than an hour after activation by the district president, the time had come: the detector left, an assignment for secondary transport – an intensive care patient is to be transferred from Winterberg to another clinic. With increasing utilization of the intensive care beds in German hospitals, the intensive care transport helicopter (ITH) will carry out transfer flights for intensive care patients together with the neighboring ITH Christoph Mittelhessen, but at the same time will continue to be used for rescue operations in accordance with the order. Less than an hour after activation by the district president, the time had come: the detector left, an assignment for secondary transport – an intensive care patient is to be transferred from Winterberg to another clinic.

Professor Dr. Simon Little, Medical Director at the Gießen Air Rescue Center and on board as an emergency doctor for the first time, explains: “In addition to rescue missions, we fly with Christoph Gießen, in particular, for intensive transfers from clinic to clinic. These missions can usually be planned, and are less time-critical because the patient is already receiving care. The new technology is an excellent support for the entire crew, the flight feels good and the design of the interior means that patient care is very efficient. In the H 145 we use the most modern redundant ventilation technology as well as a roll-in carrying system that has only been installed in this helicopter in civil air rescue so far ”. If special requirements are placed on intensive installation, Johanniter can choose between their helicopters, which is used most sensibly: “When we move infectious, non-ventilated patients, we use our IsoArk infection protection system. It consists of an isolation tent and the associated filter system. The system works to protect against external infection with a negative pressure principle. Together with a nanoparticle filter system, it is ensured that pathogens do not leave the isolation tent – staff and the environment are protected. ”In these cases, Johanniter Luftrettung uses the machine at the Reichelsheim air rescue center. There are alternating machines of the type AS 365 N3 and H 155 from Airbus Helicopters stationed there. “Thanks to the particularly large interior space of our AS 365 N3 and H 155 machines, we can attach the IsoArk insulation protection system to the patient stretcher and easily integrate it into the interior of the helicopter. We can even transport up to three people in addition to the normal three-person crew and the patient. This is particularly relevant when we are requested by so-called ECMO centers. There we pick up the team of specialists and their equipment and bring them directly to the patient’s bed. The ventilation specialists connect the patient to the cardiopulmonary support system (ECMO) on site and we fly the team and the patient safely, quickly and without interrupting intensive care to the target clinic, ”continues Little.

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